Recent Entries

  • Wishes to Outcomes Part 2: Involving Students in the Process

    If you've taught for any length of time, you've likely expressed things that you wish your students could do, and if so, undoubtedly expressed them in frustration. While no amount of rubbing will make a teaching-wish genie ascend from that bottle of Frappucino on your desk, there is s...
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  • I Wish They May, I Wish They Might: Wishes into Outcomes

    How many times have you said to yourself, your colleagues, or to anyone who would listen, “I wish my students were able to . . .”? Whether you have   only two wishes or enough to rival a 6 year-old’s Christmas list, your wish(es) for your students simply won't come...
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  • Questioning Morality

    The first text we discuss in my Literature of Illness and Trauma course is the Introduction to The Decameron. I like to begin with this text because it touches, quite violently, upon issues of community and survival in the face of tragedy. I suppose, then, that I should say that this text ...
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  • The Overlooked Value of the Syllabus

    When it comes to teaching innovation and faculty development, our thoughts go immediately to the two tech's: technology and techniques. However, if you're satisfied with the technology and techniques you're using, you'll be glad to know that you can satisfy your need to keep your courses and your te...
  • What Happens (or Doesn’t) When We Lecture

    It’s no secret that today’s students, raised on technology and nourished by social media, find the traditional classroom lecture difficult to attentively sit through. If students prefer texting to email because email takes too long to access and read, imagine how they perceive a 50- or 7...
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  • There is no "I" in "Rubric" (Well, there is but...)

    Rubrics permeate college assessment these days--in and out of the classroom. They have been a staple in middle and high school classrooms (where I first used them) for quite some time--a testament to their usefulness. Indeed, their value has withstood shifting currents in educational trends and phil...
  • Intimidation, Fear, Anger, and the First-Year College Student

    I have taught Freshman Composition at Lamar University for twelve years. For four of these years, I have also been the director of the University Writing Center. In my close dealings with students throughout my teaching career, I have encouraged, urged, and consoled students. However, spending ...
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