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Make Faculty Meetings More Meaningful

  • Faculty meetings held primarily to disseminate information do not provide opportunities for robust discourse or action.  However, this does not have to be the case.  These meetings can be more meaningful and useful if used as forums for problem-solving.  How might this work? 

     

    Select Talking Points from Survey Results

    Faculty is often asked to complete surveys so that institutions can determine what is working well and what is not.  These results are not usually shared, or, if they are, they are presented as general information. 

    Instead of doing this, an issue can be chosen as a talking point from a prioritized list that is based on survey results.  The list evidences the outcome of faculty participation in completing the survey and provides a way for faculty to employ tacit knowledge to help address issues. Other topic selection methods can include identifying recurring issues that appear on student evaluations and asking faculty to submit issues that are of concern.

     

    Why is this important?

    As K-12 teachers’ proximity to students allows them to determine and meet students’ needs and to also mitigate the impact that non-instructional issues have on students’ performance, similarly, higher education faculty’s ongoing interaction with students provides them with first-hand information of students’ needs.  Consequently, they have “live knowledge” that is essential for addressing instructional/structural improvements.    

    Giving others a voice is still the most dynamic and effective means to bring about transformative change and faculty meetings that use a meaningful approach, such as described herein will be more efficacious at meeting students’ needs.

     

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  • Bob Ertischek and Larry Marsh like this
  • Larry Marsh
    Larry Marsh The "Town Hall" faculty and staff meetings and faculty meetings at Avila University are much more oriented to eliciting the ideas and insights from all participants. Often the groups at the various round tables are asked to talk over a topic and...  more
    May 7, 2017

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